Snow Resources

Most of the information in All About Snow came from these resources. You can find them in your library or online:

Ahrens, C. D. 1988. Meteorology today: an introduction to weather, climate, and the environment, third edition. St. Paul: West Publishing Company.

Alaska Department of Fish and Game. Alaska: The Ecosystems. Accessed February 18, 2016.

American Association of Avalanche Professionals. The Avalanche Review http://www.americanavalancheassociation.org/the-avalanche-review/ (URL discontinued). Last accessed February 18, 2016.

Appalachian Mountain Club. Mountain Ecology. Accessed February 18, 2016.

Armstrong, B. R., and K. Williams. 1992. The avalanche book. Golden, CO: Fulcrum Publishing.

Avalanche.org. Accessed February 18, 2016.

Avalanche Canada. Accessed February 18, 2016.

Arvetis, C., and C. Palmer. 1986. Why does it snow? Skokie, Illinois: Rand McNally.

Atwater, M. M. 1968. The avalanche hunters. Philadelphia: Macrae Smith Company.Bentley, W. A., and W. J. Humphries. 1962. Snow crystals. New York: Dover Press.

Bianchi, J., and F. Edwards. 1992. Snow: learning for the fun of it. Newburgh, Ontario: Bungalo Books.

Calder, W.J., C.J. Stopka, and B.N. Shuman. 2014. High-elevation fire regimes in subalpine ribbon forests during the Little Ice Age and Medieval Period along the Continental Divide, Colorado, U.S.A. Rocky Mountain Geology 49(1): 75-90.

Canadian Avalanche Association. Accessed February 18, 2016.

Climate.gov. 2018, November 19. Climate and skiing. Accessed November 19, 2019.

Colorado Avalanche Information Center. Accessed February 18, 2016.

The Cyberspace Avalanche Center. Accessed February 18, 2016.

Doesken, N. J., and A. Judson. 2000. The snow booklet: a guide to the science, climatology, and measurement of snow in the United States. Fort Collins: Colorado State University.

Evans, E. K. 1965. Snow book. New York: Little, Brown, and Company.

Exchange for local observations and knowledge of the Arctic (ELOKA). Accessed February 18, 2016.

Fraser, C. 1966. Avalanches and snow safety. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons.

Fredston, J., and D. Fesler. 1994. Snow sense: a guide to evaluating snow avalanche hazard. Anchorage: Alaska Mountain Safety Center, Inc.

Heidorn, K. C. 1999. Moving the snow. Accessed February 18, 2016.

Holford, I. 1982. The Guinness book of weather facts and feats, second edition. Guiness Superlatives Ltd.

Icelights. What is the polar vortex? National Snow and Ice Data Center. Accessed November 18, 2019.

Kirk, R. 1978. Snow. New York, William Morrow and Co.

LaChapelle, E. R. 1992. Field guide to snow crystals. University of Washington Press.

Larrick, N. 1961. Junior science book of rain, hail, sleet, and snow. Champaign, Illinois: Garrard Publishing.

Liston, G.E., and M. Sturm. 1998. A snow-transport model for complex terrain. Journal of Glaciology 44(148): 498-516. doi:10.3189/S0022143000002021.

Ludlum, D. 1962. Extremes of snowfall in the United States. Weatherwise 15(6): 246-262.

Marchand, P. J. 1996. Life in the cold: an introduction to winter ecology. Lebanon, New Hampshire: University Press of New England. Accessed February 18, 2016.

McClung, D., and P. Schaerer. 1993. The avalanche handbook. Seattle: The Mountaineers.

McKelvey, B. 1995. Snow in the cities. Rochester: University of Rochester Press. Accessed February 18, 2016.

Mergen, B. 1997. Snow in America. Washington, D. C.: Smithsonian Institute Press.

National Climatic Data Center. U.S. Daily Snowfall and Snow Depth Data. Accessed February 18, 2016.

National Climatic Data Center. Recent U.S. Snowfall and Snow Depth Maps (https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/snow-and-ice/daily-snow/). Accessed February 18, 2016.

National Climatic Data Center. Snow Cover Maps. Accessed February 18, 2016.

National Climatic Data Center. U.S. Daily Snowfall and Snow Depth Data. Accessed February 18, 2016.

National Snow and Ice Data Center. State of the Cryosphere: Northern Hemisphere Snow. Accessed February 18, 2016.Daffern, T. 1983. Avalanche safety for skiers and climbers. Seattle: Cloudcap Press.

National Geographic. Arctic Fox. Accessed February 18, 2016.

National Geographic. Caribou. Accessed February 18, 2016.

National Geographic. Musk Ox. Accessed February 18, 2016.

National Geographic. Polar Bear. Accessed February 18, 2016.

National Geographic. Snowshoe hare. Accessed February 18, 2016.

National Snow and ice Data Center. Antarctic Megadunes: How the dunes were formed. Accessed February 18, 2016.

National Snow and Ice Data Center. State of the Cryosphere: Northern Hemisphere Snow. Accessed February 18, 2016.

National Weather Service. Wind Chill/Temperature Index. Accessed Accessed April 05, 2017.

National Weather Service. Winter Weather Safety and Awareness, http://www.weather.gov/os/winter/index.shtml (URL discontinued). Last accessed February 18, 2016.

Painter, T.H., Deems, J.S., Belnap, J., Hamlet, A.F., Landry, C.C., Udall, B. (2010) Response of Colorado River runoff to dust radiative forcing in snow. PNAS 107(40), 17125-17130.

Painter, T.H., Skiles, S.M., Deems, J.S., Bryant, A.C., Landry, C.C. (2012) Dust radiative forcing in snow of the Upper Colorado River Basin: 1. A 6 year record of energy balance, radiation, and dust concentrations. Water Resources Research 48(7), 48, W07521.

Public Broadcasting Service. Avalanche! (a documentary produced by the science television program NOVA). Accessed February 18, 2016.

Snowcrystals.com. Accessed February 18, 2016.

Steele, P. 1991. Snow: causes and effects. New York: F. Watts.

Sugarman, J. 1985. Snowflakes. New York: Little, Brown, and Company.EarthSky.org. What is lake-effect snow? Accessed February 18, 2016.Kocin, P. J., and L. W. Uccellini. 1990. Snowstorms along the northeastern coast of the United States: 1955 to 1985. Boston: American Meteorological Society.Lockhart, G. 1988. The weather companion. New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.Fraser, C. 1966. The avalanche enigma. London: William Clowes and Sons, Ltd.Perla, R. I., and M. Martinelli, Jr. 1976. Avalanche handbook. Washington, D. C.: United States Forest Service.

United States Geological Survey. The Water Cycle: Snowmelt Runoff. Accessed February 18, 2016.

The Weather Guys. 2018, January 8. What is a "bomb cyclone"? University of Wisconsin-Madison. Accessed November 18, 2019.

Williams, K., and B. Armstrong. 1984. The snowy torrents. Washington, D. C.: United States Forest Service.

Last updated: 10 January 2020