Is declining sea ice changing the atmosphere?

Although Arctic sea ice extent did not set a low record this year, it’s still clear that there is less sea ice than there used to be. Scientists are keeping a close eye not only on the dwindling ice, but also on the ripple effect its loss might have on the rest of the Arctic environment. A big question involves the exchange of heat between ocean and air—and the weather patterns that result.  What does current research say about how floating ice—or the lack of it—might be changing the Arctic atmosphere? Continue reading

Celebrating 35 years of sea ice satellite data

Image of Arctic sea ice derived from SMMR data

This image is derived from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR), and shows Arctic Ocean sea ice extent in August 1985. Purple and red show greater ice coverage, while greens and blues indicate less ice. The black circle over the pole indicates no data—SMMR took observations very close to, but not directly over, the pole. Image credit: NSIDC

Polar scientists are celebrating an anniversary of sorts. Thirty-five years ago, sea ice research took a great leap forward. On October 26, 1978, the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) beamed its first data records back down to Earth. The instrument, pronounced simmer, was capable of mapping global sea ice concentration and extent, giving scientists a more comprehensive look at Arctic and Antarctic sea ice. Thanks to SMMR and its successor remote sensing instruments, scientists now have a long and detailed record of sea ice that helps them understand how sea ice works, and how it is changing. Continue reading

For sea ice, age matters

Most people picture the Arctic Ocean as miles upon miles of thick sea ice. This icy expanse has become threatened as Arctic sea ice shifts from mainly old ice to much younger, thinner ice. How does this shift impact the Arctic environment? And what is the connection between the average age of ice found in the Arctic and the overall sea ice decline? Continue reading

Are we cooling?

After a cool Arctic summer, sea ice at the North Pole has recovered somewhat from last year’s record low extent. While this is a welcome pause in the downward trend of sea ice extent, some are taking it a step further and hailing this rebound as evidence that the Arctic is no longer warming. But does the recent uptick mean that we have entered a period of global cooling? NSIDC scientists point out why we shouldn’t be reading too much into one summer of less sea ice decline. Continue reading

Are Arctic cyclones chewing up sea ice?

Satellite image of the 2012 Arctic cyclone

This satellite image of the Great Arctic Cyclone was taken on August 7, 2012 when the center of the storm rolled into the middle of the Arctic Ocean. (Courtesy LANCE/NASA GSFC)

The Big One

The Great Arctic Cyclone of 2012 lifted out of Siberia on August 2nd, swirling in a counter-clockwise rotation up into the Arctic. As one of the most extreme Arctic cyclones ever recorded, its consumption of an already low sea ice extent raised many concerns. Now Arctic cyclones are garnering attention, but is all the hype warranted?

“People seem to have this thought that all this storminess is unusual,” said Mark Serreze, an Arctic climatologist and center director at NSIDC. “Well it’s not. It simply isn’t. Summer is the time for cyclones.” Arctic summers are not calm. In fact, the months of August and September see a maximum amount of cyclonic activity. Not every summer is very stormy, but overall, the Arctic is the Arctic for a reason. Continue reading