Most viewed - Arctic Climatology and Meteorolgy
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Arctic Buildings376 viewsAlthough summers posed the hazards of melt water, the winters posed problems with deeply drifting snow. In winter, windblown snow had to be cleared from the entrance of this aerological (radiosounding) hut. Image credit: EWG.
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Life on a Drifting Station372 viewsRecreation could include climbing the large ridges and hummocks on the ice station floe. These often reached 10 meters in height. During excursions like this, one of the men would typically carry a rifle for protection against polar bears. Image credit: EWG.
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Ice Hazards371 viewsDuring summer, melt ponds posed hazards to the camp. Here, a station member rows an inflatable raft in a melt pond that has formed in the middle of the camp at NP-6. Image credit: EWG.
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Ice Hazards370 viewsHere, melt ponds encroach on many of the buildings in the camp. Sometimes, inflatable boats were used for transportation. Image credit: EWG.
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Arctic Buildings369 viewsDue to changes in the ice floe surface, it was not uncommon for camps to relocate to more stable ground. This photograph was taken during the rebuilding of the camp NP-22 in 1980. Aluminum tent poles are at the right, and an overturned boat is at the left. Image credit: EWG.
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Arctic Buildings361 viewsAround some buildings in the summertime, "pedestaling" occurs because structures shade the ice and snow beneath from the sun's heat. Each subsequent summer adds to the height of the pedestal. This building on NP-22 reached 5 meters in height after seven years. Image credit: EWG.
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Life on a Drifting Station359 viewsSunset at a North Pole station. The large antennae are for studying ionospheric processes. Image credit: EWG.
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Polar Bears359 viewsHere the dogs investigate the polar bear as the polar bear retreats. Image credit: EWG.
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Ice Hazards357 viewsMost of the time, the only way to deliver supplies to the North Pole stations was by plane. Weather conditions in the sky could be just as harsh and extreme as conditions on the ground. Here, a biplane is grounded after an accident near the Kara Sea in 1981. Image credit: EWG.
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Arctic Buildings352 viewsHarsh and extreme arctic conditions required special considerations when trying to build any type of structure. Heavy machinery was used to construct and maintain the runways that allowed planes to deliver supplies. When not used for runways, tractors such as this one would be used for other construction around the camp. Image credit: EWG.
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Life on a Drifting Station351 viewsCables leading to the meteorology laboratory at NP-21 supply electricity from a diesel generator. Image credit: EWG.
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Taking Scientific Measurements351 viewsNotice the granular structure of this ice, and how large the grains are. The ruler is marked in centimeters. Image credit: EWG.
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