Most viewed - Arctic Climatology and Meteorolgy
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Taking Scientific Measurements383 viewsGerman Maximov collecting the measurement of direct solar radiation. Image credit: EWG.
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Taking Scientific Measurements383 viewsTwo station members traverse the snow survey line measuring snow density by weight. Image credit: EWG.
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Polar Bears383 viewsThe three dogs try to prevent the polar bear from coming out of the water, but the bear moves quickly and escapes into the icy terrain. Image credit: EWG.
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Scientific Instruments383 viewsA radio-sounding locator antenna. Image credit: EWG.
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Taking Scientific Measurements382 viewsDetermining instrument location by theodolite. A theodolite is a high-precision surveying instrument. Because the ice floes rotated and changed in topography as they drifted, undergoing freezing and thawing, station members needed to regularly determine the position of the instruments relative to each other and to North. Image credit: EWG.
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Arctic Buildings380 viewsEven if materials didn't need to be housed within a building, storing them outside also posed difficulties. Supplies were stacked on fuel barrels to elevate them above the snow and to protect them from melt water during summer. Image credit: EWG.
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Scientific Instruments380 viewsA close-up view of a pyranometer, which measures diffuse solar radiation. Image credit: EWG.
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Taking Scientific Measurements378 viewsNot all measurements required venturing outside. Aerologists Makurin and Ippolitov recording radio-sounding data at NP-16 in 1968. Image credit: EWG.
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Life on a Drifting Station361 viewsA biplane landing near an iceberg, off the Laptev Sea. Image credit: EWG.
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Ice Hazards360 viewsA small lead (or crack in the ice) has opened in the foreground. New leads, which form under wind stress when the ice diverges, were a constant threat to the camps. Camps often had to be relocated due to the sudden appearance of an ice lead through the middle of the camp (unless the crack appeared during summer and was simply a melt channel). Image credit: EWG.
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Scientific Instruments360 viewsAn IVO device for measuring the base height of cloud cover. IVO is the Russian abbreviation for this instrument. Image credit: EWG.
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Ice Hazards357 viewsDuring summer, moving around camp became difficult, as melting snow formed large puddles (melt ponds) and channels everywhere. Image credit: EWG.
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