CHARIS News

CHARIS Training, Almaty, Kazakhstan, May 2016

The most recent CHARIS training session was held in Almaty, Kazakhstan at the Hotel Saltanat from May 11-19, 2016. The first portion was a GIS (geographic information system) training session from May 11-13. This was instructed by Adina Racoviteanu and Mary Jo Brodzik of the CHARIS group and was hands-on training on hydrologic modeling and glacier mapping. The second portion, taught by CHARIS staff Mary Jo Brodzik, Karl Rittger, Andy Barrett, Bruce Raup and Siri Jodha Khalsa, was hands-on practice for using the python programming language to perform and analyze temperature-index snow and ice melt modeling, using as model inputs the CHARIS DEM (digital elevation model), MODIS snow cover and albedo data, MODICE snow and ice extent maps, and downscaled ERA-Interim reanalysis temperature data. The participants were then able to undertake the modeling process for their own particular research sub-basins that were derived during the previous GIS workshop. Also, at the workshop, posters brought by many of the CHARIS partner participants illustrated recent work of partner institutions.

All eight CHARIS partner countries were represented with participants from all but one partner institution. Dr. Haleem Zaman Magsi from Karakoram International University in Gilgit, Pakistan registered but unfortunately was unable to attend. There were 36 participants in total with five women among the attendees.

At the conclusion of the meeting USAID Regional Environmental Adviser for Central and South Asia, Andrei Barannik, who was in attendance for both training sessions, provided an overview of USAID’s support and interaction within the CHARIS project. Also at the end of the meeting, Professor Igor Severskiy, Director of the glaciology group within the Institute of Geography, Almaty, which hosted the CHARIS meeting, concluded by thanking the attendees for their participation.

During the sessions, Richard Armstrong and Betsy Armstrong visited the USAID mission in Almaty to discuss the CHARIS project with Nina Kavetskaya, Monika Gorzelanska, Andrei Barannik and others. They also met with a number of CHARIS partners at the workshop to discuss current and future work. Meetings were held with Rysbek Satylkanov, Institute of Water Problems and Hydropower, Kyrgyzstan; Prof. A.L. Ramanathan, Jawaharlal Nehru University, India; Dr. Rijan Kayastha, Kathmandu University, Nepal; Muhammad Jamaid, Water and Power Development Authority, Pakistan; Chhimi Dorji, Bhutan Water Partnership, Bhutan, Dendup Tshering, Sherubtse College, Royal University of Bhutan, Bhutan and Tshering Tashi, Department of Hydro-Met Services, Bhutan; and Mariam Sajood and Abeev Ahmad Sajood, Kabul University, Afghanistan.

Richard Armstrong and Betsy Armstrong traveled to Dushanbe, Tajikistan, and met with Laura Cizmo, Economic Growth Team Lead, USAID /Central Asia/ Tajikistan Country Office, and Daler Asrorov, Project Management Specialist, Office of Economic Growth

USAID, Tajikistan, to describe the CHARIS project. They also met with CHARIS partner Prof. Inom Sherovich Normatov, Institute of Water Problems, Hydropower, and Ecology, Tajikistan to discuss common research goals.

GIS training, Almaty, Kazakhstan, May 11-13, 2016 First row, left to right: Adina Racoviteanu, Tshering Tashi, C. Chatterjee, Muhammad Javaid, Rajesh Kumar Second row, left to right: Mary Jo Brodzik, Abeev Ahmad Sajood, Chhimi Dorji, Piyush Gourav, Rijan Kayastha, Mohan Bahadur Chand Third row, left to right: Rakesh Kahastha, Betsy Armstrong, Mariam Sajood, Kezang Gaden, Jambay Choden, Larissa Kogutenko Fourth row, left to right: Pankaj Thapa, Kezang Gaden, Thupstan Anachuk, Dendup Tshering Fifth row, left to right: Andrei Barrannik, Ermenbaev Bakytbek, Alexandr Kokarev, Richard Armstrong Not pictured: Shaktiman Singh and Makhbuba Kasymova Photo credit: Shaktiman Singh

GIS training, Almaty, Kazakhstan, May 11-13, 2016
First row, left to right: Adina Racoviteanu, Tshering Tashi, C. Chatterjee, Muhammad Javaid, Rajesh Kumar
Second row, left to right: Mary Jo Brodzik, Abeev Ahmad Sajood, Chhimi Dorji, Piyush Gourav, Rijan Kayastha, Mohan Bahadur Chand
Third row, left to right: Rakesh Kahastha, Betsy Armstrong, Mariam Sajood, Kezang Gaden, Jambay Choden, Larissa Kogutenko
Fourth row, left to right: Pankaj Thapa, Kezang Gaden, Thupstan Anachuk, Dendup Tshering
Fifth row, left to right: Andrei Barrannik, Ermenbaev Bakytbek, Alexandr Kokarev, Richard Armstrong
Not pictured: Shaktiman Singh and Makhbuba Kasymova
Photo credit: Shaktiman Singh

 

Participants of both training sessions at The State Historical-Cultural Museum-Reserve "Issyk" First row, left to right: Tshering Tashi, Chhimi Dorji, Jambay Choden, finder of Golden Warrior at Museum, Rajesh Kumar, Muhammad Javaid, Ermenbaev Bakytbek Second row, left to right: Vladimir Skigo, Rakesh Kayastha, Rijan Kayastha, Larissa Kogutenko, Atar Singh, Dendup Tshering, Pankaj Thapa, Karl Rittger, Siri Jodha Khalsa, Al. Ramanathan Third row, left to right: Kezang Gaden, Betsy Armstrong, Richard Armstrong, Kakhbuba Kasymova, Bruce Raup, Adina Racoviteanu, Vassiliy Kapitsa, Mary Jo Brodzik Not pictured: Andy Barrett, Pema Tshering

Participants of both training sessions at The State Historical-Cultural
Museum-Reserve “Issyk”
First row, left to right: Tshering Tashi, Chhimi Dorji, Jambay Choden, finder of Golden Warrior at Museum, Rajesh Kumar, Muhammad Javaid, Ermenbaev Bakytbek
Second row, left to right: Vladimir Skigo, Rakesh Kayastha, Rijan Kayastha, Larissa Kogutenko, Atar Singh, Dendup Tshering, Pankaj Thapa, Karl Rittger, Siri Jodha Khalsa, Al. Ramanathan
Third row, left to right: Kezang Gaden, Betsy Armstrong, Richard Armstrong, Kakhbuba Kasymova, Bruce Raup, Adina Racoviteanu, Vassiliy Kapitsa, Mary Jo Brodzik
Not pictured: Andy Barrett, Pema Tshering

Rapid Water Quality Assessment for CHARIS

As part of a field practicum requirement for the Mortenson Center in Engineering for Developing Communities at CU-Boulder, CHARIS graduate student Alia Khan conducted an assessment of drinking water quality in the Khumbu region of Nepal in early 2016 to understand the impacts of the 2015 earthquakes on water quality and resources in the Gokyo Valley. The Gokyo Valley is home to the Ngozumba Glacier and the Gokyo Lakes, which serve as the headwaters to the Dudh Koshi River. Water quality sampling was conducted specifically in the Gokyo Valley to compare to baseline data that Khan collected in 2012. Samples were collected from tributary streams, which serve as local drinking water sources and contribute to the Dudh Koshi watershed. Samples were collected along an elevation transect from Lukla, 9181 ft, to Gokyo, 15, 557 ft. Water samples were analyzed and incubated in a portable incubator in the field with the Aquagenx, Compartment Bag Test, a low cost method to detect E.coli, an indicator bacteria of fecal contamination. If fecal contamination is present, then other water-borne pathogens, which cause diarrheal disease, may also be present.

Water samples were also shipped back to the Kiowa Lab at CU-Boulder and will be analyzed for dissolved organic carbon, oxygen isotopes, a suite of nutrients, as well as trace metals. Snow samples were also collected along an elevation transect from Namche Bazaar at 11,657 ft to Gokyo Ri at 17,500 ft. Snow samples will be analyzed for dust and black carbon. Impurities like these reduce surface albedo and increase the amount of solar radiation absorbed by snow and ice, leading to enhanced melt. Khan also conducted two training sessions with local environmental specialists in Kathmandu. One was given to 10 Eco Himal Nepali staff on low cost methods to detect E.coli. EcoHimal works with communities in the Solukhumbu. CHARIS gave EcoHimal a portable incubator and a number of E.coli tests so they can begin monitoring drinking water in the respective communities they are working in. The second training on field methods for sampling black carbon in snow was at Kathmandu University (KU) in the Department of Cryosphere Sciences to the 12 graduate students of CHARIS partner, Dr. Rijan Kayastha. The KU team plans to collect snow samples during their 2016 field campaigns on the Yala Glacier and in Manang, which will be filtered in the field and shipped to CU-Boulder for dust and black carbon analysis.

Sampling water in the Gokyo Valley.

Sampling water in the Gokyo Valley.

Aquagenx E.coli Compartment Bag Test; the sample on the left from Tragnag at the top of the Gokyo Valley has no E.coli present, as indicated by the yellow color. The blue color of the sample on the right, from Green River, a tributary close to Lukla, indicates the presence of E.coli.

Aquagenx E.coli Compartment Bag Test; the sample on the left from Tragnag at the top of the Gokyo Valley has no E.coli present, as indicated by the yellow color. The blue color of the sample on the right, from Green River, a tributary close to Lukla, indicates the presence of E.coli.

CHARIS establishes a state-of-the-art water chemistry lab at Sherubtse College, Royal University of Bhutan

The University of Colorado CHARIS research project, led by Dr. Richard Armstrong, has sponsored the establishment of a new water chemistry laboratory at Sherubtse College in Kanglung, Bhutan. This is the first state-of-the-art water chemistry lab in the country. The lab will not only contribute water analyses to the CHARIS project but also will analyze water samples for environmental assessment of the country’s wetlands, streams, rivers and other water bodies.

In January 2016, Dr. Mark Williams, Professor of Geography and Holly A. Miller, Lab Manager of the Kiowa Environmental Chemistry Laboratory, Institute of Arctic & Alpine Research (INSTAAR), University of Colorado, Boulder, traveled to Thimphu, Bhutan where they met Dendup Tshering, CHARIS representative and Lecturer at Sherubtse College, and oversaw the arrival of the instrument air-shipment. After transferring the equipment to a truck, Holly Miller then traveled across Bhutan to reach Sherubtse College, located in the eastern part of the country.

Holly Miller, accompanied by her husband Colin Miller, a University of Colorado mechanical engineer who volunteered to help, and with the assistance of Dendup Tshering, Tshewang Dendup, Punya Prasad Bhandari and Jigme Wangmo, set up the new lab, testing all the equipment and ensuring that everything was functioning before returning to Boulder.

Instruments provided by the CHARIS project included a Metrhom ion chromatograph, Picarro stable water isotope analyzer and Lachet nutrient analyzer, plus pH/conductance/acid neutralization capacity meters to evaluate water quality. Also included are an ultrapure water system, filtering gear, glassware and sample bottles, essential for collecting field samples for analysis with the newly installed instrumentation.

The lab will provide the college with the ability to evaluate and quantify water quality, such as agricultural and industrial runoff and assessments of environmental impacts from hydroelectric power. In addition to providing the CHARIS project with water sample analyses, the new lab is already contracted to analyze water quality for the Kanglung watershed and has submitted a proposal to test water quality in an industrial area to assess its environmental impact. They have also responded to a bid request from an environmental consulting company for water analysis.

Thus the Sherubtse College lab is already proving its usefulness in analyzing impacts on Bhutan’s fragile environment.

Setting up the lab. From left: Tshewang Dendup, Holly A. Miller, Dendup Tshering, Punya Prasad Bhandari, Jigme Wangmo

Setting up the lab.
From left: Tshewang Dendup, Holly A. Miller, Dendup Tshering, Punya Prasad Bhandari, Jigme Wangmo

Lab staff and Officiating Director of Sherubtse College. From left: Jigme Wangmo, Punya Prasad Bhandari, Tenzin Wangchuk Ph.D., Officiating Director, Dendup Tshering, Tshewang Dendup

Lab staff and Officiating Director of Sherubtse College.
From left: Jigme Wangmo, Punya Prasad Bhandari, Tenzin Wangchuk Ph.D., Officiating Director, Dendup Tshering, Tshewang Dendup

Visit with Kathmandu University CHARIS students, Bhaktapur, Nepal, October 2015 (Excerpted from the Armstrong’s trip report for Bhutan & Nepal October 12-25, 2015)

Because the Kathmandu University campus was closed due to the Dashain Festival during our visit (October 22-24), Asian Project Manager Rijan Kayastha arranged for us to meet the seven students funded by the CHARIS project at a hotel in Bhaktapur, close to the university. Syed Hammad Ali (Pakistan) and Aniket Gupta (India) were not available to join us. The students are from India (3), Pakistan (3, including 1 woman), and Nepal (1). Students gave short talks describing their research; their research topics are described below:

Amrit Thapa (Nepal). Tribhuvan University. A snow simulation study in the Langtang River Basin using the seNorge snow model.

Mr. Rakesh Kayastha (Nepal). Research Associate, Kathmandu University, Assistant Asian Project Manager for the CHARIS project. (The previous project assistant manager Bikas Bhattarai is currently pursuing a PhD in glaciology in Norway.) Mr. Kayastha completed his M.S. by Research in Glaciology program in September 2015. His thesis title was: Application of GlabTop Model for estimating glacier ice thickness distribution and bed topography of Everest region, Nepal. He enrolled in the program in September 2013.

Niraj Kumar (India). Sharda University. Only for one semester, theory courses.

Javed Hassan (Pakistan). Hydrological modeling of Shigar Basin, Central Karakorum, Pakistan, using a positive degree day model.

Iram Bano (Pakistan). Estimation of discharge from the Gilgit River Basin, Karakoram, Pakistan, using a glacio-hydrological model.

Ramesh Kumar (India). Sharda University. Only for one semester, theory courses.

Syed Hammad Ali (Pakistan). Estimation of discharge from the Hunza River Basin, Karakoram, Pakistan, using a glacio-hydrological model (not in photo).

Aniket Gupta (India). Glacio-hydrological modeling of Chandra River basin, India (not in photo).

Two CHARIS-supported students from Kabul University and one from Nepal have completed their Masters degree studies.

Richard Armstrong described the CHARIS project and how the students’ work is contributing to project goals.

Left to right: Amrit Thapa, Nepal; Rakesh Kayastha, Research Associate, Nepal; Niraj Kumar, India; Javed Hassan, Pakistan; Richard Armstrong, Rijan Kayastha, Ms. Iram Bano, Pakistan; Ramesh Kumar, India; Betsy Armstrong

Left to right: Amrit Thapa, Nepal; Rakesh Kayastha, Research Associate, Nepal; Niraj Kumar, India; Javed Hassan, Pakistan; Richard Armstrong, Rijan Kayastha, Ms. Iram Bano, Pakistan; Ramesh Kumar, India; Betsy Armstrong

Automatic Weather Station (AWS) Training Workshop, Thimphu, Bhutan, October 2015 (Excerpted from the Armstrong’s trip report for Bhutan & Nepal October 12-25, 2015)

Richard Armstrong and Betsy Armstrong arrived in Paro on October 14th, after meeting Dr. Konrad Steffen, Director of the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL), at the airport in Delhi. Dr. Steffen was formerly the director of CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, and thus is familiar with the CHARIS project. He accompanied Richard Armstrong and Betsy Armstrong on their first visit to Sherubtse College in 2013 and volunteered the donation of the automatic weather station (AWS) that was currently unused in his study sites in Greenland. The purpose of this workshop was to teach participants how to set up the AWS and an introduction into analyzing the produced data.

Dendup Tshering met us at the airport in Paro. Dendup and his two colleagues from Sherubtse College had driven to Paro via the southern route, in and through India, then north to Paro, because the national east-west Bhutanese highway is under construction.

The training began on October 15th at the Royal University of Bhutan (RUB) in Thimphu. Richard Armstrong and Betsy Armstrong met briefly with the Vice Chancellor of RUB, Mr. Nidup Dorji. The 11 participants represented the following Bhutanese organizations: Renewable Natural Resources Research Development Center (RNR/RDC), Yusipang (3 participants), The Ugyen Wangchuck Institute for Conservation and Environment (UWICE), Bumthang (1), Royal Thimphu College (1), College of Natural Resources (CNR), Lobesa (1), Snow & Glacier Division, Department of Hydro-Met Services (DHMS), Ministry of Economic Affairs, (MoEA) Thimphu (1), and Sherubtse College, Kanglung (4). Two of the participants were women.

In the workshop, as Dr. Steffen unpacked the box that contained the AWS, he and Richard Armstrong explained each instrument, its purpose, how to set up the tower, how to install the sensors on the tower and program the AWS data logger. The participants all had similar reasons for attending this AWS training: to learn how to program and install the instruments, and to process and interpret data since in many cases they would be establishing baseline data for their research in climate and environmental studies in Bhutan. General goals included learning how to install an AWS in the field and learning how to specifically monitor the change in climate as related to forestry and community adaptation, and specific studies of aerosol radiative forcing over Bhutan.

The workshop concluded with the participants dismantling the AWS, packing the instruments and the tower for delivery to Sherubtse College, where it has now been set up on the campus and data are being recorded.

We also met with John Farrington, World Wildlife Fund (WWF), Thimphu, to discuss common research interests.

Participants in the Automatic Weather Station training, Thimphu, Bhutan, October 2015

Participants in the Automatic Weather Station training, Thimphu, Bhutan, October 2015

 

 

Participants work at assembling components of the AWS instrumentation.

Participants work at assembling components of the AWS instrumentation.

Dr. Konrad Steffen, center, explains aspects of AWS operation.

Dr. Konrad Steffen, center, explains aspects of AWS operation.

GIS Fundamentals and Remote Sensing Analysis Training Course, Sherubtse College, Royal University of Bhutan, Kanglung, Trashigang, April 26-May 1, 2015

Adina Racoviteanu, PhD and consultant to the USAID CHARIS Project, taught the GIS Fundamentals and Remote Sensing Analysis Workshop at Sherbutse College from April 26-May 1, 2015. The workshop was organized by the College’s Centre for Science and Environmental Research (CSER) in collaboration with the Centre for Climate Change and Spatial Information (CCCSI) with financial assistance from the CHARIS Project. Workshop objectives were to introduce theoretical concepts and fundamentals of GIS, provide an introduction to analysis capabilities of ArcGIS software, and strengthen institutional capacity to carry out glaciological research and water resource assessment. Participants were from diverse disciplines within the college.

For additional details, see the Sherubtse College site.

Participants of the GIS Fundamentals and Remote Sensing Analysis Training, Sherubtse College, Bhutan, 26 April - 1 May 2015

Participants of the GIS Fundamentals and Remote Sensing Analysis Training, Sherubtse College, Bhutan, 26 April – 1 May 2015

CHARIS Training Course, Dehradun, India, October 13-16, 2014

The CHARIS Project held its third partners meeting in October at the Four Points Sheraton Hotel in Dehradun, India. The format was a 4-day training course with lectures and hands- on exercises, along with short reports from partners. The attendees represented the partner countries of Afghanistan, Bhutan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, India, Nepal and Tajikistan.

Under the direction of CHARIS project director Richard Armstrong, NSIDC researchers Siri Jodha Singh Khalsa, Adina Racoviteanu, Karl Rittger, Mary Jo Brodzik and Bruce Raup and CHARIS south Asia manager Rijan Kayastha presented talks on working with DEMS and delineating basins, mapping snow and glaciers with remote sensing and hydrological modeling. Each lecture was followed by hands-on exercises with participants working on their own laptops under the guidance of the instructors.

The training course feedback was extremely positive, with participants saying the course was very well organized, appreciating the interactive and informative elements with a good balance of lectures and exercises.

 Participants of the Dehradun, India, Short Course Training, October 13-­16, 2014 Credit: Bikas Chandra Bhattarai


Participants of the Dehradun, India, Short Course Training, October 13-­16, 2014
Credit: Bikas Chandra Bhattarai

Update from Kathmandu University’s M.S. by Research in Glaciology program

September 2014

Two CHARIS-supported students have completed their studies for M. S. by Research in Glaciology at Kathmandu University, under the direction of Dr. Rijan Bhakta Kayastha, D. Sc., Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering.  They are:

Hafizullah Rasouli, Department of Geology, Faculty of Geosciences, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Hedayatullah Arian, Department of Hydro-Meteorology, Faculty of Geosciences, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Left to right: Hafizullah Rasouli, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan; Hedayatullah Arian, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan; Richard Armstrong, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA. Credit: B. Armstrong

Left to right: Hafizullah Rasouli, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan; Hedayatullah Arian, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan; Richard Armstrong, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA. Credit: B. Armstrong

Six new CHARIS-supported students are now enrolled at Kathmandu University in the masters program under the direction of Dr. Rijan Bhakta Kayastha, D. Sc., Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering. They are:

Amrit Thapa, Nepal
M. Sc. in Environmental Sciences, School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India
B. Sc. Environment science, Tri-Chandra Campus, Ghantaghar, Kathmandu

Amrit Thapa

Amrit Thapa

Atar Singh, India
M. Sc. (Tech) in Geophysics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
B. Sc., DBS (PG) College Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India

Atar Singh

Atar Singh

Iram Bano, Pakistan
B. Sc. (Earth Sciences), Karakoram International University, Gilgit, Pakistan

Iram Bano

Iram Bano

Javed Hassan, Pakistan
B. Sc. (Earth Sciences), Karakoram International University Gilgit, Pakistan
FSc (Pre-engineering), Federal Board of Intermediate and secondary education
Islamabad Pakistan
SSC (Science), Federal Board of Intermediate and secondary education
Islamabad Pakistan

Javed Hassan

Javed Hassan

Naveen Kumar, India
M. Sc. in Environmental Sciences, School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India
B. Sc. Zoology (H), St. Xevier college, Ranchi, Jharkhand

Naveen Kumar

Naveen Kumar

Syed Hammad Ali, Pakistan
M. Sc. in Environmental Science from College of Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan
B.Sc. in Biological Science from University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan

Sayed Hammad Ali

Sayed Hammad Ali

CHARIS Partner Meeting in Pokhara, Nepal

The CHARIS project, in coordination with Dr. Rijan B. Kayastha, Associate Professor, Kathmandu University and CHARIS South Asia Project Manager, held its second partners meeting in Pokhara, Nepal, December 1–2, 2013, at the Landmark Hotel. The first meeting was held in Almaty, Kazakhstan on May 13–18, 2013. Partner institutions were represented from all eight CHARIS countries:

  • Afghanistan (Kabul University, Kabul),
  • Bhutan (Sherbutse College, Royal University of Bhutan, Kanglung Trashigang),
  • India (Sharda University, Greater Noida, U. P., and Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), New Delhi),
  • Kazakhstan (Institute of Geography, Almaty),
  • Kyrgyzstan (Institute of Water Problems and Hydropower, Bishkek),
  • Nepal (Himalayan Cryosphere Climate and Disaster Research Center (HiCCDRC), Kathmandu University),
  • Pakistan (Pakistan Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA), Glacier Monitoring Research Centre, Lahore, and Karakoram International University, Gilgit),
  • Tajikistan (Institute of Water Problems, Hydropower and Ecology, Dushanbe).

The primary purpose of this meeting was for the partners to describe their projects: current status, recent field research activities and future plans.

Front row, left to right: Kunduz Rysbek Kyzy, Institute of Water Problems and Hydropower, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan; Betsy Armstrong, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA; Pankaj Thapa, Sherubtse College, Kanglung Trashigang, Bhutan; Hafizullah Rasouli , Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan, presently graduate student at Kathmandu University, Nepal; Alana Wilson, INSTAAR, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA; Rajesh Kumar, Sharda University, Greater Noida, U. P., India; Danial Hashmi, Pakistan Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA), Glacier Monitoring Research Centre, Lahore, Pakistan; Hedayatullah Arian, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan, presently graduate student at Kathmandu University, Nepal; Adina Racoviteanu, Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l'Environnement, Domaine Universitaire, France; Andy Barrett, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA; Tshering Wangdi, Sherubtse College, Kanglung Trashigang, Bhutan; Thupstan Angchuk, Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), New Delhi, India; Astha Karki, Himalayan Cryosphere Climate and Disaster Research Center (HiCCDRC), Kathmandu University, Nepal. Back row, left to right: Bikas Chandra Bhattarai, Himalayan Cryosphere Climate and Disaster Research Center (HiCCDRC), Kathmandu University, Nepal; Rijan B. Kayastha, Himalayan Cryosphere Climate and Disaster Research Center (HiCCDRC), Kathmandu University, Nepal; Sonam Chhogyel, Sherubtse College, Kanglung Trashigang, Bhutan; Ghulam Abbas Anjum, Pakistan Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA), Lahore, Pakistan; Madhuranjan Vatsa, Sharda University, Greater Noida, U.P., India; Siri Jodha Singh Khalsa, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA; Richard Armstrong, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA; Ari Nathan, U.S Embassy, Kathmandu, Nepal; Alexandr Yegorov, Institute of Geography, Almaty, Kazakhstan; Mark W. Williams, INSTAAR, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA; Inom Sherovich Normatov, Institute of Water Problems, Hydropower and Ecology, Dushanbe, Tajikistan; Parviz Normatov, Institute of Water Problems, Hydropower and Ecology, Dushanbe, Tajikistan; Bruce Raup, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA; A. L. Ramanathan, Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), New Delhi, India; Rysbek Satylkanov, Institute of Water Problems and Hydropower, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan; Jose George Pottakkal, Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), New Delhi, India. Front row, left to right: Kunduz Rysbek Kyzy, Institute of Water Problems and Hydropower, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan; Betsy Armstrong, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA; Pankaj Thapa, Sherubtse College, Kanglung Trashigang, Bhutan; Hafizullah Rasouli, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan, presently graduate student at Kathmandu University, Nepal; Alana Wilson, INSTAAR, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA; Rajesh Kumar, Sharda University, Greater Noida, U. P., India; Danial Hashmi, Pakistan Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA), Glacier Monitoring Research Centre, Lahore, Pakistan; Hedayatullah Arian, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan, presently graduate student at Kathmandu University, Nepal; Adina Racoviteanu, Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l’Environnement, Domaine Universitaire, France; Andy Barrett, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA; Tshering Wangdi, Sherubtse College, Kanglung Trashigang, Bhutan; Thupstan Angchuk, Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), New Delhi, India; Astha Karki, Himalayan Cryosphere Climate and Disaster Research Center (HiCCDRC), Kathmandu University, Nepal.
Back row, left to right: Bikas Chandra Bhattarai, Himalayan Cryosphere Climate and Disaster Research Center (HiCCDRC), Kathmandu University, Nepal; Rijan B. Kayastha, Himalayan Cryosphere Climate and Disaster Research Center (HiCCDRC), Kathmandu University, Nepal; Sonam Chhogyel, Sherubtse College, Kanglung Trashigang, Bhutan; Ghulam Abbas Anjum, Pakistan Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA), Lahore, Pakistan; Madhuranjan Vatsa, Sharda University, Greater Noida, U.P., India; Siri Jodha Singh Khalsa, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA; Richard Armstrong, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA; Ari Nathan, U.S Embassy, Kathmandu, Nepal; Alexandr Yegorov, Institute of Geography, Almaty, Kazakhstan; Mark W. Williams, INSTAAR, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA; Inom Sherovich Normatov, Institute of Water Problems, Hydropower and Ecology, Dushanbe, Tajikistan; Parviz Normatov, Institute of Water Problems, Hydropower and Ecology, Dushanbe, Tajikistan; Bruce Raup, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA; A. L. Ramanathan, Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), New Delhi, India; Rysbek Satylkanov, Institute of Water Problems and Hydropower, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan; Jose George Pottakkal, Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), New Delhi, India.

 

Presentations

Rijan Bhakta Kayastha, Himalayan Cryosphere Climate and Disaster Research Center (HiCCDRC), Kathmandu University, Nepal
Activities of Kathmandu University 

Danial Hashmi, Pakistan Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA)
Glacier Monitoring Research Centre, Lahore, Pakistan
Current Status of CHARIS Project Activities in WAPDA

Prof. AL. Ramanathan & Team, Glacier Research Group, School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru Unviersity, New Delhi, INDIA
Current status of CHARIS project Jawaharlal Nehru University, India

I. Severskiy, A. Yegorov, Institute of Geography, Almaty, Kazakhstan
Dynamics of Tuyuksu glacier for the last 56 years

Hafizullah Rasouli, Kabul University and Kathmandu University
Study on Hydro-Meteorological Characteristics of Maidan River basin, Kabul, Afghanistan

Rysbek Satylkanov, Institute of Water Problems and Hydropower, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
Monitoring the Kara-Batkak Glacier and Hydro-Meteorological Conditions in the Chon-Kyzyl-Suu River Basin

Dr. Rajesh Kumar, Sharda University, Greater Noida, U. P,India
Observation of Glacio-hydrological processes in Shaune Garang Valley

Inom Normatov, Institute of Water Problems, Hydropower and Ecology, Dushanbe, Tajikistan
Current status of Charis project, IWPHE Tajikistan

Hedayatullah Arian, Kabul University and Kathmandu University
Study on Hydro-meteorological Characteristic of Panjshir river basin, Afghanistan

University of Colorado CHARIS scientists then presented material on the following subjects relevant to the partners’ projects:

Richard Armstrong, Principal Investigator
CHARIS project: current status and activities

Bruce Raup
Formatting and metadata guidelines for submission of CHARIS data to NSIDC

Andy Barrett
Reanalysis data and methods for downscaling

Siri Jodha Singh Khalsa
Optimal DEMs for the CHARIS region

Alana Wilson
Water chemistry studies – collaborative work in Nepal, with Mark Williams

Adina Racoviteanu, CHARIS consultant
Advances in techniques to identify and map debris-covered glaciers

During the wrap-up discussion partners suggested short courses and training ideas for future meetings. The meeting ended with partners agreeing that this group has the capacity to provide relevant and current science to policy makers, and is setting the path for continued collaboration among these High Asian countries.

Visit to CHARIS’ Newest Partner

CHARIS team members Richard Armstrong, Alana Wallace and Betsy Armstrong, along with Koni Steffen, former CIRES director and current Director of the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) visited CHARIS’s newest partner, Sherubtse College, Royal University of Bhutan, in Kanglung, November 22–24, 2013. After a tour of the college, we were introduced to the faculty and facilities of the college and held discussions on planning future collaboration for field work beginning in spring-summer 2014.

CHARIS team with members of the Center for Climate Change and Spatial Information (CCCSI), Sherubtse College, Royal University of Bhutan, November 23, 2013. Kneeling, left to right: Dr. Sonam Wangmo, Dean of Academic Affairs; Alana Wallace; Pema Lhendrup, Lecturer, Department of Geography; Betsy Armstrong Standing, from left to right: Richard Armstrong; Ramakanta Barman, Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry; Tshering Wangdi, Director; Sonam Chogyel, Dean of Research and Industrial Linkages; Pankaj Thapa, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography and Coordinator, CCCSI; Dharmendra Chaudhur, Senior Lecturer, Geography and Planning; Koni Steffen, WSL

CHARIS team with members of the Center for Climate Change and Spatial Information (CCCSI), Sherubtse College, Royal University of Bhutan, November 23, 2013.
Kneeling, left to right: Dr. Sonam Wangmo, Dean of Academic Affairs; Alana Wallace; Pema Lhendrup, Lecturer, Department of Geography; Betsy Armstrong
Standing, from left to right: Richard Armstrong; Ramakanta Barman, Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry; Tshering Wangdi, Director; Sonam Chogyel, Dean of Research and Industrial Linkages; Pankaj Thapa, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography and Coordinator, CCCSI; Dharmendra Chaudhur, Senior Lecturer, Geography and Planning; Koni Steffen, WSL

 

CHARIS Short Course and Partner Presentations in Almaty, Kazakhstan

CHARIS, in coordination with the local organizing institution, the Institute of Geography, Almaty, and with funding from USAID, brought all the CHARIS partners together for a short course and partner presentations on May 13–17, 2013, at the Saltanat Hotel in Almaty, Kazakhstan. The short course, presented by University of Colorado scientists from the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research and the National Snow and Ice Data Center offered lectures on Isotopic and Geochemical Tracers (Mark Williams and Alana Wilson), Mountain Hydrology (Mark Williams), Glacier Mapping (Bruce Raup), and Glacier Mass Balance (Andy Barrett). These lectures were also distributed on memory sticks to the participants at the beginning of the meeting.

Each partner presented their current work with ample time allowed for discussion throughout the meeting. Partner presentation titles and affiliations are listed below. The meeting concluded with a visit to the Institute of Geography and field trip to the Big Almaty Lake field station, organized by Alexandr Yegorov, Institute of Geography.

The CHARIS group near the Big Almaty Lake field station. Back row, standing, from left to right are Danial Hashmi, Rafaqat Ali Malik, Alana Wilson, George Jose Pottakkal , Shaktiman Singh, A.L. Ramanathan, Bruce Raup, Bikas Chandra Bhattarai, Larissa Kogutenko, Alexandr Yegorov, Inom Sherovich Normatov, Bakyt Ermenbaev, Vladimir Shatravin, and Richard Armstrong. Front row, kneeling, from left to right are Rajesh Kumar, Danila Uvarov, Andy Barrett, Rijan Bhakta Kayastha, Mark Williams, Chandranath Chatterjee, and Parviz Normatov.

The CHARIS group near the Big Almaty Lake field station. Back row, standing, from left to right are Danial Hashmi,  Malik Rafaqat Ali, Alana Wilson, George Jose Pottakkal , Shaktiman Singh, A.L. Ramanathan, Bruce Raup, Bikas Chandra Bhattarai, Larissa Kogutenko, Alexandr Yegorov, Inom Sherovich Normatov, Bakyt Ermenbaev, Vladimir Shatravin, and Richard Armstrong.
Front row, kneeling, from left to right are Rajesh Kumar, Danila Uvarov, Andy Barrett, Rijan Bhakta Kayastha, Mark Williams, Chandranath Chatterjee, and Parviz Normatov.

 

 

VasilyKapista

Vasily Kapista

Zamira Usmanova

Zamira Usmanova

Not in the photo above but on the field trip and working hard to make sure that all went well were Vasily Kapista and Zamira Usmanova. Also not in photo but at the workshop was Rysbek Satylkanov.

 

 

 

In advance of the meeting, partners were sent a short questionnaire that asked about familiarity with various tools and data formats. Many respondents (about 40%) were familiar with the common GIS data formats as well as the main commercial tools for working with satellite imagery.

The second questionnaire following the meeting asked participants about their meeting experiences. Approximately half of the participants responded. All said that the short courses contained the expected material and were at a scientific level that met their needs. All were satisfied with the conference and hotel facilities. When asked for suggestions for improvement, several participants requested more hands-on training in GIS and image analysis, as well as isotope data analysis. Other suggested topics included mountain geochemistry interrelationships, discussion of unified methods of measurement, and ecosystem adaptation to shrinking glaciers. In the “additional comments” section, several participants expressed general praise and gratitude to the organizers.

Short course participants are listed below along with their organization and country. For presenters, the title of the presentation is given as well.

Presentations

Bikas Chandra Bhattarai
Kathmandu University
Dhulikhel, Kavre, Nepal
Preliminary results of mass balance studies of Yala and Rikha Samba Glaciers in Nepal

Danial Hashmi and Malik Rafaqat Ali
Pakistan Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA)
Glacier Monitoring Research Centre
Lahore, Pakistan
WAPDA Initiatives in Upper Indus Basin Investigations

Rijan Kayastha
Kathmandu University
Dhulikhel, Kavre, Nepal
Activities of the Kathmandu University Cryosphere Monitoring Project

Alexandr Kokarev
Institute of Geography
Almaty, Kazakhstan
Presentation of Central Asian Regional Glaciological Centre as a Category 2 under the auspices of UNESCO

Rajesh Kumar
Sharda University
Greater Noida, U.P., India
Shaune Garang Glacier: Status of studies and future plans

Inom Normatov
Institute of Water Problems, Hydropower and Ecology
Dushanbe, Tajikistan
Modern state and development perspective of water resources & climate and environment and strategy of the risk management in the Transboundary Zeravshan and Vakhsh River Basins

A.L. Ramanathan
Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU)
New Delhi, India
Input to the regional mass balance modeling in western Himalayas: Case study from Chotta Shigri Glacier, HP, India

Rysbek Satylkanov and Bakyt Ermenbaev
Institute of Water Problems and Hydropower
Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
Tien-Shan vysokogrny Research Centre and its activities

Vladimir Shatravin and Bolat Uralbekov
Institute of Water Problems and Hydropower
Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
The potential of uranium isotopic method when studying flow formation of poorly studied mountain river basins

Additional participants

Chandranath Chatterjee
Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU)
New Delhi, India

Vasiliy Kapitsa
Institute of Geography
Almaty, Kazakhstan

Ashley King
USAID
Almaty, Kazakhstan

Larissa Kogutenko
Institute of Geography
Almaty, Kazakhstan

George Jose Pottakkal
Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU)
New Delhi, India

Shaktiman Singh
Sharda University
Greater Noida, U.P., India

Zamira Usmanova
Institute of Geography
Almaty, Kazakhstan

Danila Uvarov
Institute of Geography
Almaty, Kazakhstan

Alexandr Yegorov
Institute of Geography
Almaty, Kazakhstan

CHARIS Goes to Central Asia

Richard Armstrong, CHARIS Principal Investigator, visited Central Asia in September-October 2012, to explore opportunities for collaboration with institutions in Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, the Kyrgyz Republic and Uzbekistan.

The CHARIS project collaborates directly with key Asian research institutions to develop a consensus regarding the research methodologies to be used to achieve project goals. This effort includes joint research and capacity building that will enhance the scientific understanding of the regional hydrology among our Asian partners.

Professor Igor Severskiy, Kazakhstan Institute of Geography, Almaty, his daughter Marina, English teacher at USAID and translator, Betsy Armstrong and Richard Armstrong discuss plans for future collaboration on September 24, 2012. Professor Severskiy directs research on the Tuyuksu glacier, the site of one of the longest running mass balance studies in the world.

Meeting with Meteo Tajikistan in Dushanbe, September 25, 2012. Director Mr. Mahmad Safarov (center) and members of his staff (left), with Richard Armstrong and Daler Asrorov, USAID (right).
Credit: B. Armstrong

Richard Armstrong met with Professor Inom Normatov, Institute of Water Problems, Hydropower and Ecology, and Tajikistan National University, in Dushanbe, Tajikistan, September 26, 2012, to develop a collaborative study on the glacier-fed Vakhsh River, a tributary of the Amudarya.
Credit: B. Armstrong

Meeting with the glacier and hydrology working group at the Institute of Water Problems and Hydropower Engineering in Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic, September 26, 2012. First row (left to right) Tamara Tuzova, Richard Armstrong, Vladimir V. Romanovski, Valerii A. Kuzmichenok; Second row (left to right) Bakyt Ermenbayev, Vladimir Shatravin, Marina Lischenko (translator), Betsy Armstrong (communications specialist), Rysbek Satylkanov. Credit: K. Satylkanov

Meeting with the glacier and hydrology working group at the Institute of Water Problems and Hydropower Engineering in Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic, September 26, 2012. First row (left to right) Tamara Tuzova, Richard Armstrong, Vladimir V. Romanovski, Valerii A. Kuzmichenok; Second row (left to right) Bakyt Ermenbayev, Vladimir Shatravin, Marina Lischenko (interpreter), Betsy Armstrong (communications consultant), Rysbek Satylkanov.
Credit: K. Satylkanov

Richard Armstrong traveled to the Kara Batkak glacier with Shatravin Bakyt, Director of the Tien-Shan High Mountain Research Center field project and others, to establish a plan for monitoring ablation and stream discharge in support of CHARIS goals. The research hut is shown in the foreground. The glacier terminus is at 3400 m and the glacier is located in the Tien Shan Mountains, Kyrgyz Republic.
Credit: B. Armstrong

On the Kara Batkak glacier with the Institute of Water Problems and Hydropower, Kyrgyzstan, September 2012 (left to right) Vladimir Shatravin (Director, Glaciology Lab), Betsy Armstrong (Communications Consultant), Marina Lischenko (Interpreter), Richard Armstrong (CHARIS PI) and Bakyt Ermenbayev (Director, Tien Shan High Mountain Research Center) Credit: Janat Abdrayev

On the Kara Batkak glacier with the Institute of Water Problems and Hydropower, Kyrgyzstan, September 2012 (left to right) Vladimir Shatravin (Director, Glaciology Lab), Betsy Armstrong (Communications Consultant), Marina Lischenko (Interpreter), Richard Armstrong (CHARIS PI) and Bakyt Ermenbayev (Director, Tien Shan High Mountain Research Center) Credit: Janat Abdrayev


The old, defunct Soviet stream discharge gauge is in a good location—a well defined channel a few hundred meters below the terminus of the Kara Batkak, with a single channel flowing from the glacier. A new gauging station will be installed during 2013. This stream channel should also be excellent for water chemistry sampling.
Credit: B. Armstrong