Is declining sea ice changing the atmosphere?

Although Arctic sea ice extent did not set a low record this year, it’s still clear that there is less sea ice than there used to be. Scientists are keeping a close eye not only on the dwindling ice, but also on the ripple effect its loss might have on the rest of the Arctic environment. A big question involves the exchange of heat between ocean and air—and the weather patterns that result.  What does current research say about how floating ice—or the lack of it—might be changing the Arctic atmosphere? Continue reading

Celebrating 35 years of sea ice satellite data

Image of Arctic sea ice derived from SMMR data

This image is derived from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR), and shows Arctic Ocean sea ice extent in August 1985. Purple and red show greater ice coverage, while greens and blues indicate less ice. The black circle over the pole indicates no data—SMMR took observations very close to, but not directly over, the pole. Image credit: NSIDC

Polar scientists are celebrating an anniversary of sorts. Thirty-five years ago, sea ice research took a great leap forward. On October 26, 1978, the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) beamed its first data records back down to Earth. The instrument, pronounced simmer, was capable of mapping global sea ice concentration and extent, giving scientists a more comprehensive look at Arctic and Antarctic sea ice. Thanks to SMMR and its successor remote sensing instruments, scientists now have a long and detailed record of sea ice that helps them understand how sea ice works, and how it is changing. Continue reading

Does dusty snow mean less water in the Rockies?

Have you been skiing in the Western U.S. and been surprised by brown snow? We recently talked to a research team that studies these coats of dirt. The dust storms that cause dusty snow appear to be getting bigger, thanks to climate warming drying out this region. Worse, dust on snow may increase flooding and slowly smother water supplies in the southwestern U.S. How bad is this situation and who will be affected by it? Can anything be done? Continue reading

Core of climate history

Lou and the Ice Core Drill

Scientists take ice core samples in cold, windy, and forbidding environments. After drilling through solid ice to retrieve a core, initial measurements are taken before it is sent away for more in-depth analysis and storage. Photo credit: NSIDC courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer

People have asked how scientists know that today’s climate situation is unusual. Hasn’t the Earth undergone many cold and warm cycles before? Could this just be another? Buried in the world’s ice sheets is a long story of climate on Earth–and the contribution of atmospheric CO2 to warming or cooling. Scientists can access a unique and detailed look at the history of the Earth’s atmosphere through ice cores and start to understand the recent climate in context of past ones. Continue reading

Are scientists conservative about sea ice?

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy encountered only small patches of sea ice in the Chukchi Sea when this photograph was taken on July 20, 2011. (Courtesy NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy encountered only small patches of sea ice in the Chukchi Sea when this photograph was taken on July 20, 2011. (Courtesy NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

Guest post by Walt Meier, NSIDC Scientist

Arctic sea ice set a record minimum extent in September 2012, far below the previous record low in 2007. Summer extents have been far lower than average for the last decade, with several record or near-record years. Looking at the numbers, one is tempted to think that the Arctic Ocean may reach nearly sea ice-free conditions within just a few years. But most expert analyses indicate that we’re likely at least a couple decades away from seeing a blue Arctic Ocean during the summer.

Continue reading