Is an East Antarctic melt probable?

Does melting of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) pose a threat to sea level rise? Studies of the ice melt that fuels sea level rise often focus on the prominent warming and melting of glaciers in Greenland and western Antarctica. The massive East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) has been largely ignored, until recently. “It’s generally been assumed that it’s so big and so cold that it’s probably immune to some of the warming trends we’ve seen across the planet,” said Chris Stokes, a professor at Durham University. Two recent studies, however, paint a new picture of the world’s thickest, unwavering giant, suggesting the need to look deeper into eastern Antarctica. Continue reading

Does dusty snow mean less water in the Rockies?

Have you been skiing in the Western U.S. and been surprised by brown snow? We recently talked to a research team that studies these coats of dirt. The dust storms that cause dusty snow appear to be getting bigger, thanks to climate warming drying out this region. Worse, dust on snow may increase flooding and slowly smother water supplies in the southwestern U.S. How bad is this situation and who will be affected by it? Can anything be done? Continue reading

Are Arctic cyclones chewing up sea ice?

Satellite image of the 2012 Arctic cyclone

This satellite image of the Great Arctic Cyclone was taken on August 7, 2012 when the center of the storm rolled into the middle of the Arctic Ocean. (Courtesy LANCE/NASA GSFC)

The Big One

The Great Arctic Cyclone of 2012 lifted out of Siberia on August 2nd, swirling in a counter-clockwise rotation up into the Arctic. As one of the most extreme Arctic cyclones ever recorded, its consumption of an already low sea ice extent raised many concerns. Now Arctic cyclones are garnering attention, but is all the hype warranted?

“People seem to have this thought that all this storminess is unusual,” said Mark Serreze, an Arctic climatologist and center director at NSIDC. “Well it’s not. It simply isn’t. Summer is the time for cyclones.” Arctic summers are not calm. In fact, the months of August and September see a maximum amount of cyclonic activity. Not every summer is very stormy, but overall, the Arctic is the Arctic for a reason. Continue reading

Are Greenland’s galloping glaciers slowing down?

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One of the three major ice streams studied, the outlet of the Jakobshavn-Isbræ glacier produces about 10 percent of Greenland’s icebergs due to calving. Located in West Greenland, its icebergs float down the fjord, sometimes getting stuck in shallower waters for years. Though the glacier’s acceleration rate has fluctuated through the years, it is still a major contributor to Greenland’s ice loss. Courtesy Spencer Weart, flickr (http://www.flickr.com/photos/weartpix/4077525679/)

For the past decade, Greenland’s ice sheet has been losing its ice more rapidly, raising concerns about its contribution to sea level rise. A recent study, published in Nature, proposes that Greenland could slow its shedding of ice from its massive ice sheet into the ocean. “This doesn’t mean glacial recession and melting will slow,” said Faezeh M. Nick, a glaciologist from the University Centre in Svalbard in Norway. Nick’s study points out that the problem is not so straightforward. Continue reading