NSIDC at AGU

Photograph of Ira Flatow speaking at AGU

Ira Flatow, host of National Public Radio’s Talk of the Nation: Science Friday, spoke at the AGU Presidential Forum, reminding us why we need to communicate science clearly and effectively. Credit: Laura Naranjo

If NSIDC scientists are busy all year long conducting their own research, how do they keep up with what their colleagues elsewhere are doing? They exchange flurries of emails and phone calls, of course, and collaborate on journal articles and projects. But once a year, many of them are in the same place at the same time for the same reason: to attend the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). Whether you’re interested in glaciers or geoids, sea ice or plate tectonics, Earth or Mars, AGU is right up your alley. Each year, more than 20,000 scientists, students, and educators converge in San Francisco for the weeklong meeting. Many of NSIDC’s staff participate in the meeting as well, presenting talks and posters detailing their latest research, data, and success stories. Continue reading

What caused last summer’s Greenland surface melt?

Data image showing extreme Greenland surface melt in summer 2012

These satellite-derived maps show the extent of surface melt over Greenland’s ice sheet during the summer of 2012. On July 8, about 40 percent of the ice sheet had melted at or near the surface. By July 12, nearly 97 percent of the ice sheet surface had melted. High pressure ridges that persisted over Greenland created a lingering heat dome that caused the extensive melt. Credit: Nicolo E. DiGirolamo, SSAI/NASA GSFC, and Jesse Allen, NASA Earth Observatory

During the summer of 2012, scientists noticed something unusual in Greenland. On July 8, about 40 percent of the Greenland Ice Sheet surface showed signs of melting. But a mere four days later, 97 percent of the surface was melting, an extent that was unprecedented in the satellite record.

Just how unprecedented was this event? Does it mean that the Greenland Ice Sheet is possibly on the way out, like summer sea ice in the Arctic? Continue reading