Most viewed - Images by project
274 viewsMe on a ski-doo before my first ski-doo trip.
Photo by John Maurer, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado.
274 viewsA close-up shot from the helicopter of another huge melt lake.
Photo by John Maurer, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado.
273 viewsOur pilots for the southern traverse: Jonas and Tomas. Jonas (left) is from Iceland and a legendary pilot in Greenland. Koni has known him for 25 years, back when Jonas was somewhat of a daredevil pilot from the stories Koni told us. Tomas (right) is from Denmark. Both spoke English fairly well.
Photo by John Maurer, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado.
272 viewsThe equipment required to drill permafrost cores consists of shovels and a tarp, a motor to power the drill, a cooler to keep the samples frozen, a toolbox, a steel pry bar, and an augur drill bit. (Credit: Kevin Schaefer, NSIDC)
272 viewsWe begin the difficult task of shoveling all the snow and drilling out all the ice from in front of and around Swiss Camp.
Photo by John Maurer, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado.
272 viewsResearchers prepare their snowmobiles during the 2013 Arctic Observing Network (Snownet) field project in Alaska's North Slope.
272 viewsA researcher's winter gloves provide a sense of scale to sastrugi, sharp irregular grooves or ridges formed on a snow surface by wind erosion, seen during the 2013 Arctic Observing Network (Snownet) project.
272 viewsNina Brudermann releasing one of her balloons into the sky; each balloon has an insulated video camera attached.
Photo Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos, NSIDC
permafrost, nsidc, kevin schaefer, alaska, barrow271 viewsKevin Schaefer walks along the road to a next survey site near Barrow Alaska on August 11, 2013. Contrary to what the sign says, the effective speed limit was actually 5 mph (Credit: Elchin Jafarov, NSIDC).
271 viewsLin Liu pulls a ground penetrating radar unit through the tundra near Barrow, Alaska on to measure the active layer depth. The radar unit (in the box) emits a pulse which reflects off the permafrost to measure the active layer depth, which is recorded in the computer held by Andy Parsekian. (Credit: Kevin Schaefer, NSIDC)
271 viewsLARISSA researchers prepare to take off for a trip to the peninsula
270 viewsTingjun Zhang, Alessio Gusmeroli, Lin Liu, and Tim Schaefer check gear before starting a new survey of active layer depth using ground penetrating radar on August 16, 2012. Zhang holds the radar controller while the yellow antenna rests at his feet next to a spool of survey line. (Credit: Kevin Schaefer, NSIDC)
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