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Arctic Buildings174 viewsAround some buildings in the summertime, "pedestaling" occurs because structures shade the ice and snow beneath from the sun's heat. Each subsequent summer adds to the height of the pedestal. This building on NP-22 reached 5 meters in height after seven years. Image credit: EWG.
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174 viewsA view of the Brooks mountain range on the northern slope of Alaska during the 2012 SnowNet expedition. --Credit: NSIDC, Mark Serreze
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174 viewsOne of several aerial shots taken on the day of the 18th of October from the AS350 Squirrel.
Photo Credit: NSIDC Courtesy Rachel Marsh
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Arctic Buildings173 viewsDue to changes in the ice floe surface, it was not uncommon for camps to relocate to more stable ground. This photograph was taken during the rebuilding of the camp NP-22 in 1980. Aluminum tent poles are at the right, and an overturned boat is at the left. Image credit: EWG.
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172 viewsView from the plane (another 'twin otter') down onto the ice sheet during our flight south.
Photo by John Maurer, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado.
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Ice Hazards171 viewsMost of the time, the only way to deliver supplies to the North Pole stations was by plane. Weather conditions in the sky could be just as harsh and extreme as conditions on the ground. Here, a biplane is grounded after an accident near the Kara Sea in 1981. Image credit: EWG.
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Polar Bears170 viewsDogs provided companionship and entertainment for people living in the station camp, and they also alerted the camp when polar bears were present. Here, dogs are approaching a polar bear as it emerges from a lead (crack) in the ice. Image credit: EWG.
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170 viewsTerry Haran (front) and Ted Scambos (back), hard at work on one of their ice sites.
Photo Credit: NSIDC Courtesy Robert Massom
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Life on a Drifting Station169 viewsSunset at a North Pole station. The large antennae are for studying ionospheric processes. Image credit: EWG.
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Taking Scientific Measurements169 viewsA ruler measures the ice freeboard, or the height of the ice above the water. Ice draft, on the other hand, is the depth of the ice below the surface of the water. Notice the elongated crystals. Image credit: EWG.
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169 viewsIcebergs in Beascochea Bay, photographed during the 2013 LARISSA Expedition. The Larsen Ice Shelf System, Antarctica (LARISSA) Project is a large, interdisciplinary, multi-institute study to explore every aspect of the deteriorating Larsen Ice Shelf region in Antarctica. Participating researchers set up instruments on the glaciers that feed into the remaining portion of the Larsen ice shelf. As changes occur on the ice, the stations will record it in data and pictures. (Credit: Ted Scambos, NSIDC) Read the expedition blog on http://iceshelf.wordpress.com.
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168 viewsResearchers fly over Crane Glacier to look for an area to set up their instruments and an Extreme Ice Survey camera, during the 2013 LARISSA expedition. The Larsen Ice Shelf System, Antarctica (LARISSA) Project is a large, interdisciplinary, multi-institute study to explore every aspect of the deteriorating Larsen Ice Shelf region in Antarctica. Participating researchers set up instruments on the glaciers that feed into the remaining portion of the Larsen ice shelf. As changes occur on the ice, the stations will record it in data and pictures. (Credit: Ted Scambos, NSIDC) Read the expedition blog on http://iceshelf.wordpress.com.
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