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TS_04_MakotoLab2.jpg
121 viewsMakoto Suwa weighing and taking measurements of the ice core samples.
Image Credit: NSIDC courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer.
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Polar Bears120 viewsDogs provided companionship and entertainment for people living in the station camp, and they also alerted the camp when polar bears were present. Here, dogs are approaching a polar bear as it emerges from a lead (crack) in the ice. Image credit: EWG.
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120 viewsOur sleeping tents, which we put up after arriving at camp.
Photo by John Maurer, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado.
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120 viewsCargo lines outside Swiss Camp.
Photo by John Maurer, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado.
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120 viewsThe automatic weather station (AWS) near the coast that we are going to cut down since it has been so difficult to reach by ski-doo over the past few years. Photo by John Maurer, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado.
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120 viewsAfter taking down the station in the previous photo, we fly back to Swiss Camp. This is a view from the helicopter of camp. Really shows how camp is just a small speck out on the vast Greenland ice sheet. Photo by John Maurer, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado.
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120 viewsA snow pit that I dug and analyzed at Swiss Camp. It was one of my primary duties to dig and analyze snow pits at the various sites we visited.
Photo by John Maurer, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado.
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120 viewsAll done! After two days of work, you can now actually see the wooden platform that Swiss Camp rests on. Hopefully when all of the surrounding snow melts this summer, it will now flow down this platform and away from the tents.
Photo by John Maurer, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado.
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Life on a Drifting Station119 viewsSunset at a North Pole station. The large antennae are for studying ionospheric processes. Image credit: EWG.
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Ice Hazards119 viewsMost of the time, the only way to deliver supplies to the North Pole stations was by plane. Weather conditions in the sky could be just as harsh and extreme as conditions on the ground. Here, a biplane is grounded after an accident near the Kara Sea in 1981. Image credit: EWG.
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Ice Hazards119 viewsA small lead (or crack in the ice) has opened in the foreground. New leads, which form under wind stress when the ice diverges, were a constant threat to the camps. Camps often had to be relocated due to the sudden appearance of an ice lead through the middle of the camp (unless the crack appeared during summer and was simply a melt channel). Image credit: EWG.
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Ice Hazards119 viewsDuring summer, moving around camp became difficult, as melting snow formed large puddles (melt ponds) and channels everywhere. Image credit: EWG.
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