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TS_02_Scott01.JPG
155 viewsDrifts of snow covered the Megadunes team's Scott tents.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site
TS_03_SpiritFreedom.JPG
155 viewsThe crew boarding the C-130 "Spirit of Freedom".
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site
TS_04_SnowPit1.jpg
155 viewsOne of several snow pits created during the expedition.
Image Credit: NSIDC courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer.
TS_04_MakotoLab1.jpg
154 viewsMakoto Suwa weighing and taking measurements of the ice core samples.
Image Credit: NSIDC courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer.
TS_04_Snowmobile.JPG
154 viewsThe snowmobiles dragging the GPR/GPS system.
Image Credit: NSIDC courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer.
05_taking_measurements_05.jpg
Taking Scientific Measurements153 viewsDetermining instrument location by theodolite. A theodolite is a high-precision surveying instrument. Because the ice floes rotated and changed in topography as they drifted, undergoing freezing and thawing, station members needed to regularly determine the position of the instruments relative to each other and to North. Image credit: EWG.
gearheard_hr.jpg
Shari Gearheard153 viewsNSIDC Scientist Biography
larissa2009-2010_scambosbauer_radarsled.JPG
153 viewsRob Bauer (left) and Ted Scambos operate the radar sled during the 2009-2010 LARISSA expedition
Maurer_Greenland_2004_091.jpg
153 viewsOur first stop on the southern traverse at the NASA-SE station. Here we are in the snow accumulation region ("dry snow zone") of Greenland where it rarely experiences any melt. Photo by John Maurer, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado.
TS_03_Heli02.jpg
153 viewsAn aerial view of the helicopter taking data of the sea ice below.
Photo Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos, NSIDC
02_station_life_09.jpg
Life on a Drifting Station152 viewsRecreation could include climbing the large ridges and hummocks on the ice station floe. These often reached 10 meters in height. During excursions like this, one of the men would typically carry a rifle for protection against polar bears. Image credit: EWG.
03_arctic_buildings_03.jpg
Arctic Buildings152 viewsAround some buildings in the summertime, "pedestaling" occurs because structures shade the ice and snow beneath from the sun's heat. Each subsequent summer adds to the height of the pedestal. This building on NP-22 reached 5 meters in height after seven years. Image credit: EWG.
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