Close

Service Interruption

 
Most viewed
KS_0517.jpg
54 viewsTingjun Zhang, Alessio Gusmeroli, Lin Liu, and Tim Schaefer check gear before starting a new survey of active layer depth using ground penetrating radar on August 16, 2012. Zhang holds the radar controller while the yellow antenna rests at his feet next to a spool of survey line. (Credit: Kevin Schaefer, NSIDC)
KS_0572.jpg
54 viewsIn this photo taken on August 16, 2012, Tim Schaefer, Lin Liu, Alessio Gusmeroli, and Tingjun Zhang cook food and examine the day’s observations of active layer depth at camp just south of Deadhorse, Alaska. (Credit: Kevin Schaefer, NSIDC)
KS_0798.jpg
54 viewsThis permafrost core extracted from a depth of 1.5 meters on August 20, 2012 near Toolik Lake, Alaska has been frozen for thousands of years, yet green moss is visible at the 9 centimeter mark. (Credit: Kevin Schaefer, NSIDC)
KS_1259.jpg
54 viewsLin Liu pulls a ground penetrating radar unit through the tundra in rainy weather as Andy Persekian and Elchin Jafarov follow behind. The survey near Barrow, Alaska measures active layer depth. The radar unit (in the box) emits a pulse which reflects off the permafrost to measure the active layer depth, which is recorded in the computer held by Andy Parsekian. (Credit: Kevin Schaefer, NSIDC)
LL_6493.jpg
54 viewsAndy Parsekian sets up the ground penetrating radar equipment for a survey of active layer depth near Barrow, Alaska on August 13, 2013. (Credit: Lin Liu).
TZ_0338.jpg
54 viewsKevin Schaefer and Lin Liu photograph and wrap permafrost core samples on August 17, 2012 while Alessio Gusmeroli and Tim Schaefer drill more permafrost core samples. (Credit: Tingjun Zhang, NSIDC)
TZ_0414.jpg
54 viewsDawn finds Kevin Schaefer and Tim Schaefer still sleeping at camp near the Sagavanirktok River south of Deadhorse, Alaska on August 16, 2012. Mud makes the trucks appear brown, although their true colors are red and blue (Credit: Tingjun Zhang, NSIDC).
TZ_APE_Jul12_0370.jpg
54 viewsA herd of several thousand caribou stalled our progress as they crossed the Dalton highway near Deadhorse, Alaska on July 12, 2009. (Credit: Tingjun Zhang, NSIDC)
EJ_0057.jpg
permafrost, nsidc, kevin schaefer, alaska, barrow53 viewsKevin Schaefer pulls a ground penetrating radar unit through the tundra near Barrow, Alaska on August 14, 2013 to measure the active layer depth. The radar unit (in the box) emits a pulse which reflects off the permafrost to measure the active layer depth, which is recorded in the computer held by Andy Parsekian (Credit: Elchin Jafarov, NSIDC).
EJ_0088.jpg
permafrost, nsidc, kevin schaefer, alaska, barrow53 viewsAndy Parsekian, Kevin Schaefer, and Lin Liu use a ground penetrating radar to measure the depth of an ice wedge on August 15, 2013. The survey line lies perpendicular to the ice wedge and similar ice wedges crisscross the tundra in the background (Credit: Elchin Jafarov, NSIDC).
KS_1260.jpg
52 viewsLin Liu pulls a ground penetrating radar unit through the tundra in rainy weather. The survey near Barrow, Alaska measures active layer depth. The radar unit (in the box) emits a pulse which reflects off the permafrost to measure the active layer depth, which is recorded in the computer held by Andy Parsekian. (Credit: Kevin Schaefer, NSIDC)
KS_APE_Jul13_256.jpg
52 viewsThis picture taken on July 13, 2009 shows a typical borehole after collecting a permafrost core sample. The ice and soil shavings that result from the auger bit used to drill the core sample have a look and consistency of wet concrete (Credit: Kevin Schaefer, NSIDC).
1324 files on 111 page(s)

Browse Galleries

View Index for All Albums

Help/FAQ

Photo & Image Gallery FAQ

Questions or comments about the NSIDC Photo Gallery? Contact the NSIDC User Services Office.

Look up snow and ice related words and terminology in our Cryosphere Glossary

Visit our Education Center to learn more about snow, ice, glaciers, frozen ground, and research in cold regions.

Read about Scientists at NSIDC