Most viewed - Antarctica
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336 viewsErin Pettit, Ronald Ross, and Suk Young Yun wait for a helicopter load at Spring Point during the 2013 LARISSA Project. The Larsen Ice Shelf System, Antarctica (LARISSA) Project is a large, interdisciplinary, multi-institute study to explore every aspect of the deteriorating Larsen Ice Shelf region in Antarctica. Participating researchers set up instruments on the glaciers that feed into the remaining portion of the Larsen ice shelf. As changes occur on the ice, the stations will record it in data and pictures. (Credit: Ted Scambos, NSIDC) Read the expedition blog on http://iceshelf.wordpress.com.
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336 viewsThe AWI self-developed Helicopter EM Sensor in action beneath the AS350 Squirrel.
Photo Credit: NSIDC Courtesy Alice O'Connor
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335 viewsMegadunes are slightly rounded at their crests and are so subtle that a person on the ground cannot see the pattern. In this aerial photograph, the megadune area looks like light and dark stripes in the snow.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site
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335 viewsAn airborne view of the overlapping nila shifting into the smooth snow-covered sea ice.
Photo Credit: NSIDC Courtesy Andi Pfaffling
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333 viewsDuring the first year of the Antarctic Megadunes expedition, researchers found "pipes" in the hard-packed snow. The pipes start just beneath the surface and go down into the snow. One deep pipe, like the one shown here, was at least 6 feet (1.9 meters) deep. The pipes appear to be cracks that form near the surface of the ice and then freeze over.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site
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333 viewsFlags led to the Endurance tent from the main camp of the Antarctic Megadunes expedition, to help researchers find their way around in low visibility conditions.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site
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332 viewsMegadunes are slightly rounded at their crests and are so subtle that a person on the ground cannot see the pattern. In this aerial photograph, the megadune area looks like light and dark stripes in the snow.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site

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332 viewsThe Royal Society Range in Antarctica rises to 4000 meters (13,000 feet) at its highest point.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site
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331 viewsMegadunes are slightly rounded at their crests and are so subtle that a person on the ground cannot see the pattern. In this aerial photograph, the megadune area looks like light and dark stripes in the snow.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site
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329 viewsAn airborne view of the overlapping nila shifting into the smooth snow-covered sea ice.
Photo Credit: NSIDC Courtesy Andi Pfaffling
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327 viewsRonald Ross and Rob Bauer work on Extreme Ice Survey cameras during the 2013 LARISSA Project. The Larsen Ice Shelf System, Antarctica (LARISSA) Project is a large, interdisciplinary, multi-institute study to explore every aspect of the deteriorating Larsen Ice Shelf region in Antarctica. Participating researchers set up instruments on the glaciers that feed into the remaining portion of the Larsen ice shelf. As changes occur on the ice, the stations will record it in data and pictures. (Credit: Ted Scambos, NSIDC) Read the expedition blog on http://iceshelf.wordpress.com.
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327 viewsRonald Ross, Rob Bauer, and NSIDC lead scientist Ted Scambos assemble Extreme Ice Survey cameras during the 2013 LARISSA Project. The Larsen Ice Shelf System, Antarctica (LARISSA) Project is a large, interdisciplinary, multi-institute study to explore every aspect of the deteriorating Larsen Ice Shelf region in Antarctica. Participating researchers set up instruments on the glaciers that feed into the remaining portion of the Larsen ice shelf. As changes occur on the ice, the stations will record it in data and pictures. (Credit: Ted Scambos, NSIDC) Read the expedition blog on http://iceshelf.wordpress.com.
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