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Taking Scientific Measurements163 viewsNot all measurements required venturing outside. Aerologists Makurin and Ippolitov recording radio-sounding data at NP-16 in 1968. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Taking Scientific Measurements162 viewsGerman Maximov collecting the measurement of direct solar radiation. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Ice Hazards139 viewsDuring summer, melt ponds posed hazards to the camp. Here, a station member rows an inflatable raft in a melt pond that has formed in the middle of the camp at NP-6. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Ice Hazards144 viewsWhen a pond melts, a whirlpool forms, emptying the pond in minutes. This photograph of a melt pond whirlpool is from NP-6. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Taking Scientific Measurements193 viewsOne of the primary purposes of the drifting stations was to collect all possible meteorological data while on the ice floe. This involved installing, calibrating, and maintaining the instruments. Here, researcher German Maximov conducts a routine calibration of a pyranometer (in the large tube). Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Ice Hazards135 viewsHere, melt ponds encroach on many of the buildings in the camp. Sometimes, inflatable boats were used for transportation. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Ice Hazards152 viewsDuring summer, moving around camp became difficult, as melting snow formed large puddles (melt ponds) and channels everywhere. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Ice Hazards148 viewsA small lead (or crack in the ice) has opened in the foreground. New leads, which form under wind stress when the ice diverges, were a constant threat to the camps. Camps often had to be relocated due to the sudden appearance of an ice lead through the middle of the camp (unless the crack appeared during summer and was simply a melt channel). Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Ice Hazards180 views"Pedestaling" occurs in summer because structures shade the ice and snow beneath from the sun's heat. Although this supply bag offers an example on a small scale, pedestaling frequently occurred around buildings and large structures. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Arctic Buildings152 viewsDue to changes in the ice floe surface, it was not uncommon for camps to relocate to more stable ground. This photograph was taken during the rebuilding of the camp NP-22 in 1980. Aluminum tent poles are at the right, and an overturned boat is at the left. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Ice Hazards149 viewsMost of the time, the only way to deliver supplies to the North Pole stations was by plane. Weather conditions in the sky could be just as harsh and extreme as conditions on the ground. Here, a biplane is grounded after an accident near the Kara Sea in 1981. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Arctic Buildings177 viewsAlthough summers posed the hazards of melt water, the winters posed problems with deeply drifting snow. In winter, windblown snow had to be cleared from the entrance of this aerological (radiosounding) hut. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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