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Last additions - Arctic Climatology and Meteorolgy
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Scientific Instruments139 viewsAn IVO device for measuring the base height of cloud cover. IVO is the Russian abbreviation for this instrument. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Scientific Instruments144 viewsThis meteorological instrument box is at the standard height of two meters above the surface. Image credit: EWGFeb 14, 2013
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Scientific Instruments143 viewsA radio-sounding locator antenna. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Scientific Instruments138 viewsA close-up view of a pyranometer, which measures diffuse solar radiation. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Scientific Instruments135 viewsWhen the anchors were not insulated, the snow melted out from around the mast bases, causing them to topple. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Scientific Instruments148 viewsInstrument masts were insulated using mounds of hay to help keep them upright and prevent the snow from melting out from around them. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Polar Bears208 viewsNot all of the ice phenomena on the ice floes were naturally occurring. Station members sometimes made the most of their surroundings, witnessed in this polar bear made of snow. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Scientific Instruments158 viewsA closer view of the instrument array at NP-21. The camp buildings in the background are just visible through the blowing snow. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Scientific Instruments153 viewsStation members were responsible for recording measurements from a variety of different instruments. Shown here is an array of meteorological instruments at NP-21. From left are the instrument for solar radiation measurement (pyranometer, albedometer, actinometer and balancemeter), the shelter housing thermometers for air temperature and humidity and the hair hygrometer, the precipitation gauge (Tetrakov type), and the anemometer, which is mounted on a mast at 10 meters. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Polar Bears158 viewsThis station member was just climbing around on the ridges and hummocks of the ice floe, but, like all who ventured away from camp, he carried a rifle for protection from polar bears. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Polar Bears171 viewsBeyond the ridges of ice, dogs chase the polar bear, ensuring that it does not approach the camp. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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Polar Bears153 viewsThe three dogs try to prevent the polar bear from coming out of the water, but the bear moves quickly and escapes into the icy terrain. Image credit: EWG.Feb 14, 2013
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