Last additions - Megadunes 2002/2003
TS_02_RobSastrugi.JPG
220 viewsRob Bauer stands next to a sastrugi in the Megadunes area.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site
Oct 07, 2008
TS_02_ProtectGear.JPG
165 viewsTed Scambos wears goggles and a balaclava to protect his face from the harsh Antarctic weather.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site
Oct 07, 2008
TS_02_FSTP04.JPG
212 viewsThe Megadunes team underwent training in the Field Safety Training Program at McMurdo Station before relocating to the Megadunes site. Here, the team completes their crevasse rescue training.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site
Oct 07, 2008
TS_02_FSTP03.JPG
211 viewsThe Megadunes team practice field safety skills at McMurdo Station.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site
Oct 07, 2008
TS_02_Dunes12.JPG
230 viewsMegadunes are slightly rounded at their crests and are so subtle that a person on the ground cannot see the pattern. In this aerial photograph, the megadune area looks like light and dark stripes in the snow.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site



Oct 07, 2008
TS_02_GPSGPR.JPG
207 viewsTed Scambos poses with the GPS/GPR surveying system used during the Antarctic Megadunes expedition.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site
Oct 07, 2008
TS_02_FlagstoCamp.JPG
220 viewsFlags led to the Endurance tent from the main camp of the Antarctic Megadunes expedition, to help researchers find their way around in low visibility conditions.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site
Oct 07, 2008
TS_02_FirnMeasure.JPG
224 viewsDuring the first year of the Antarctic Megadunes expedition, researchers found "pipes" in the hard-packed snow. The pipes start just beneath the surface and go down into the snow. One deep pipe, like the one shown here, was at least 6 feet (1.9 meters) deep. The pipes appear to be cracks that form near the surface of the ice and then freeze over.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site
Oct 07, 2008
TS_02_FSTP02.JPG
209 viewsThe Megadunes team learn about field safety at McMurdo Station.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site
Oct 07, 2008
TS_02_FSTP01.JPG
164 viewsThe Megadunes team learns about field safety during a training session at McMurdo Station.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site
Oct 07, 2008
TS_02_Erebus.JPG
304 viewsMt. Erebus looms over McMurdo Station in Antarctica.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site
Oct 07, 2008
TS_02_Dunes10.JPG
231 viewsMegadunes are slightly rounded at their crests and are so subtle that a person on the ground cannot see the pattern. In this aerial photograph, the megadune area looks like light and dark stripes in the snow.
Image Credit: Courtesy Ted Scambos and Rob Bauer, NSIDC
Megadunes Web site

Oct 07, 2008
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