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Taking Scientific Measurements202 viewsOne of the primary purposes of the drifting stations was to collect all possible meteorological data while on the ice floe. This involved installing, calibrating, and maintaining the instruments. Here, researcher German Maximov conducts a routine calibration of a pyranometer (in the large tube). Image credit: EWG.
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Taking Scientific Measurements170 viewsGerman Maximov collecting the measurement of direct solar radiation. Image credit: EWG.
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Taking Scientific Measurements166 viewsNot all measurements required venturing outside. Aerologists Makurin and Ippolitov recording radio-sounding data at NP-16 in 1968. Image credit: EWG.
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Taking Scientific Measurements169 viewsA lone station member taking snow line (snow survey) measurements. Image credit: EWG.
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Taking Scientific Measurements157 viewsDetermining instrument location by theodolite. A theodolite is a high-precision surveying instrument. Because the ice floes rotated and changed in topography as they drifted, undergoing freezing and thawing, station members needed to regularly determine the position of the instruments relative to each other and to North. Image credit: EWG.
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Taking Scientific Measurements162 viewsTwo station members traverse the snow survey line measuring snow density by weight. Image credit: EWG.
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619 viewsResearchers discuss plans during the 2009 SnowNet project.
From left to right:
Matthew Sturm, Drew Slater, and Sveta Berezovskaya
Image courtesy Mark Serreze, NSIDC.
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681 viewsResearchers start to dig a snow pit.

From left to right:
Drew Slater,Matthew Sturm, and Steph Saari
Image courtesy Mark Serreze, NSIDC.
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640 viewsMark Serreze digs a deep snow pit.
Image courtesy Mark Serreze, NSIDC.
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584 viewsDrew takes a turn in the pit.
Image courtesy Mark Serreze, NSIDC.
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671 viewsThe snow pit looks deep when you're standing at the bottom.
Image courtesy Mark Serreze, NSIDC.
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814 viewsMatthew & Drew work the monster snow pit.
Image courtesy Mark Serreze, NSIDC.
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