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103 viewsLin Liu checks the day's data at basecamp. (Credit: Kevin Schaefer, NSIDC)
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105 viewsLin Liu pulls a ground penetrating radar unit through the tundra in rainy weather as Andy Persekian and Elchin Jafarov follow behind. The survey near Barrow, Alaska measures active layer depth. The radar unit (in the box) emits a pulse which reflects off the permafrost to measure the active layer depth, which is recorded in the computer held by Andy Parsekian. (Credit: Kevin Schaefer, NSIDC)
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103 viewsLin Liu pulls a ground penetrating radar unit through the tundra in rainy weather. The survey near Barrow, Alaska measures active layer depth. The radar unit (in the box) emits a pulse which reflects off the permafrost to measure the active layer depth, which is recorded in the computer held by Andy Parsekian. (Credit: Kevin Schaefer, NSIDC)
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112 viewsResearch volunteer Tim Schaefer, Standford University scientist Lin Liu, and NSIDC senior research scientist Tingjun Zhang drill a permafrost sample south of Deadhorse, Alaska on July 10, 2009. The head nets protect the researchers from the clouds of mosquitoes that continually swarmed around them. (Credit: Kevin Schaefer, NSIDC)
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114 viewsStandford University scientist Lin Liu, NSIDC senior research scientist Tingjun Zhang, and research volunteer Tim Schaefer pull the auger bit containing a permafrost core out of a newly drilled hole near Deadhorse, Alaska on July 10, 2009. (Credit: Kevin Schaefer, NSIDC)
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117 viewsStandford University scientist Lin Liu and research volunteer Tim Schaefer are attempting to remove a drill bit that accidently froze into the permafrost at a site just south of Deadhorse, Alaska on July 11, 2009. The researchers spent eight hours chipping the drill bit out of the permafrost using a crowbar, pry bar, and a hammer (Credit: Kevin Schaefer, NSIDC)
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111 viewsThis picture taken on July 13, 2009 shows a typical borehole after collecting a permafrost core sample. The ice and soil shavings that result from the auger bit used to drill the core sample have a look and consistency of wet concrete (Credit: Kevin Schaefer, NSIDC).
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113 viewsOn the 2009 trip to drill permafrost samples, the researchers’ truck was so loaded with equipment that retrieving anything required a headlong dive into the back. Here, Standford University scientist Lin Liu dives into the truck to retrieve his toothbrush in the morning. (Credit: Kevin Schaefer, NSIDC)
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106 viewsAndy Parsekian sets up the ground penetrating radar equipment for a survey of active layer depth near Barrow, Alaska on August 13, 2013. (Credit: Lin Liu).
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646 viewsMuir Glacier, photographed by William O. Field on 13 August 1941 (left) and by Bruce F. Molnia on 31 August 2004 (right). From the NSIDC Glacier Photograph Collection: Repeat Photography of Glaciers.
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623 viewsGlacial meltwater. Denali National Park, AK. From the air,
small plane. 05/25/07
Image Credit: Courtesy Lynn French, NSIDC
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452 viewsGlacial meltwater. Denali National Park, AK. From the air,
small plane. 05/25/07
Image Credit: Courtesy Lynn French, NSIDC
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