Glacier Types: Tidewater

Tidewater glaciers are valley glaciers that flow all the way down to the ocean. They often calve numerous small icebergs, which can sometimes pose problems for shipping lanes.

Historic photograph of Taku Glacier, Alaska, 1929Taku Glacier winds through the coastal mountains of southeastern Alaska. After flowing for 55 kilometers (34 miles), the glacier terminates in Taku Bay near Juneau, Alaska. —Credit: Photograph by U. S Navy. 1929. Taku Glacier: From the Glacier Photograph Collection. Boulder, Colorado USA: National Snow and Ice Data Center. Digital media.

Historic photograph of Muir Glacier, Alaska, 1893In this 1893 photograph, T. J. Richardson (left), and Frank LaRoche (right) look out over the terminus of Muir Glacier in what is now Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska. —Credit: Frank LaRoche. 1893. Muir Glacier: From the Glacier Photograph Collection. Boulder, Colorado USA: National Snow and Ice Data Center. Digital media.

Historic photograph of Columbia Glacier, Alaska, 1969In this photograph from 1969, small glaciers flow into the larger Columbia Glacier from mountain valleys on both sides. Columbia Glacier flows out of the Chugach Mountains into Columbia Bay, Alaska. Although Columbia Glacier still streams out into ocean, it has been retreating quickly. At present, the ice front lies upstream of the first large bend in the glacier trunk. —Credit: Photographer unknown. 1969. Columbia Glacier: From the Glacier Photograph Collection. Boulder, Colorado USA: National Snow and Ice Data Center. Digital media.

Historic photograph of Lamplugh Glacier, Alaska, 1941Lamplugh Glacier shows the terminus of a typical tidewater glacier, calving small icebergs into Glacier Bay, Alaska. For scale, note the man standing on the rocks in the foreground near the center of the photograph. —Credit: Photograph by William Osgood Field. 1941. Lamplugh Glacier: From the Glacier Photograph Collection. Boulder, Colorado USA: National Snow and Ice Data Center. Digital media.