Glacier Features: Glacier terminus

The terminus is the end of a glacier, usually the lowest end, and is also often called a glacier toe or snout.

Historic photograph of Lamplugh Glacier, Alaska, 1950Two people rest near the tidewater terminus of Lamplugh Glacier, Alaska. —Credit: Photograph by William Osgood Field. 1950. Lamplugh Glacier: From the Glacier Photograph Collection. Boulder, Colorado USA: National Snow and Ice Data Center. Digital media.

Historic photograph of Bradfield Glacier, Alaska, 1907Early glacier explorers pose in front of the terminus of Bradfield Glacier, which spans the border between Alaska and Canada. —Credit: Photograph by W. W. Eaton. 1907. Bradfield Glacier: From the Glacier Photograph Collection. Boulder, Colorado USA: National Snow and Ice Data Center. Digital media

Historical photograph of Rendu Glacier, Alaska, 1929The terminus of Rendu Glacier in Alaska is darkened by debris and rocks on its surface. Streams of glacial runoff and a glacial lake are visible at the glacier's terminus. —Credit: Photographer unknown. 1929. Rendu Glacier: From the Glacier Photograph Collection. Boulder, Colorado USA: National Snow and Ice Data Center. Digital media.

Historic photograph of Columbia Glacier, Alaska, 1899Columbia Glacier winds through Alaska's Chugach Mountains for 51 kilometers (32 miles), terminating in Prince William Sound. The glacier is also is up to 550 meters (1,800 feet) thick. Note the scale of the ship that steamed near the glacier's tidewater terminus in 1899. —Credit: Photograph by Grove Karl Gilbert. 1899. Columbia Glacier: From the Glacier Photograph Collection. Boulder, Colorado USA: National Snow and Ice Data Center. Digital media.